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September 2015 Archives

Suing a physician for errors in provision of free medical care, P.2

In our last post, we began speaking about protections at both the state and federal level which shield volunteer physicians from liability in the event of a mistake that injures a patient. We’ve already mentioned the Federal Volunteer Protection Act, the Federal Tort Claims Act, and Michigan’s Good Samaritan Law.

Suing a physician for errors in provision of free medical care, P.1

A recent article in the online journal, Medical Economics, focused on an issue that doesn’t come up too often in discussions of medical malpractice. That issue is the liability of physicians for errors in the course of volunteer work. What kind of liability do physicians open themselves up to when they engage in volunteer work, and what options for recovery are available to patients who are harmed by a negligent volunteer physicians?

Pursuing damages for medical error as a VA patient, P.2

Last time, we began speaking about the Federal Tort Claims Act and the general elements that must be proven in order to successfully pursue such a claim. One important point that needs to be mentioned about the FTCA is that before a claimant actually pursues litigation under the FTCA, he or she must first file a claim with the federal agency believed to be responsible for the injuries and wait for the agency to deny the claim, take no action, or offer an unsatisfactory settlement.

Pursuing damages for medical error as a VA patient, P.1

As we mentioned in our last post, VA patients do not have the same ability to pursue damages for medical errors as civilian patients. This does not mean it is impossible, only that the means of obtaining compensation is slightly different and a bit more circumscribed.

Report shows VA investigating fewer medical errors even as errors increase

Veterans' Administration hospitals, as readers may have heard, do not have the greatest track record in terms of preventing medical errors. To be sure, medical errors can and do occur from time to time at every hospital, even in the absence of negligence. However, hospitals should continually be working on reducing preventable errors, since these can have a significant impact on the quality of care for patients and shouldn't be occurring in the first place.