Menu Location

Detroit Medical Malpractice Blog

Class action lawsuit against hospital settled for $190 million

  • 20
  • August
    2014

When most of us hear the term medical malpractice we generally tend to think of medical error of some sort. The truth, though, is that medical malpractice encompasses a wide range of erroneous and inappropriate behavior on the part of medical professionals and their employers. A recent class action lawsuit against Johns Hopkins Hospital involving thousands of patients is a good example of this.

The case resulted in a settlement of $190 million for over 7,000 women who were harmed by a doctor accused of violating doctor-patient trust by carrying around a concealed camera and recording pelvic exams. The activity is alleged to have gone on over a number of years, and was discovered after a female colleague of the physician reported that she thought something fishy was going on with the doctor’s special pen. Sadly, the physician ended up committing suicide shortly after his activity came to light. 

Survey of research shows medication errors common among children

  • 05
  • August
    2014

In a recent post, we wrote on the issue of medication errors in nursing home settings and noted the surprising frequency with which these errors occur. Medication errors are not uncommon only among the elderly, though, but also in health care settings involving children. According to a new study which looked at a number of previous studies on the issue of medication errors, anywhere from five to 27 percent of all medication prescriptions for children result in child patients taking the incorrect dosage of the drug.

The study found that the reason for this has largely to do with deficiencies in the way prescriptions are filled and administered.  For example, doctors who use preprinted prescription order sheets are less likely to cause prescription errors. The reduction in error has been shown to be as high as 82 percent. 

Lack of transparency in medical care problematic for patients

  • 29
  • July
    2014

According to a recent study published in the Journal of Patient Safety, every year over 400,000 people die from preventable medical error and scores more are harmed. In light of this, it can be said with certainty that Medical error is a serious issue in health care, and all of us deserve to be better informed about when medical error has occurred and about our providers’ performance records.

Unfortunately, only a handful of states have laws which require hospitals to report medical errors to the public at present. Consumers are able to find information about medical errors at the federal level on Hospital Compare, a website run by Medicare, but that information is limited. Recent efforts under the Affordable Care Act have tried to increase transparency, but time will tell whether this is successful. 

Drug abuse not uncommon in nursing homes

  • 25
  • July
    2014

Medication errors are a rather common mistake in the field of health care, particularly in institutions where elderly people live, such as nursing homes and assisted living centers. It is the responsibility of these institutions, of course, to ensure that residents receive the medication they have been prescribed in a timely way.

Something that may surprise some of our readers is that abuse of certain powerful medications is not at all uncommon in nursing homes and assisted living centers. In particular, antipsychotic medications are well known to be overused at nursing homes. According to some, up to one in five patients in nursing homes are unnecessarily medicated with antipsychotic drugs.

Mother agues for higher cap on noneconomic damages in stillbirth case

  • 14
  • July
    2014

A judge for the Lenawee Circuit Court held a hearing last month on the issue of what the cap should be for birth injuries in a medical malpractice case involving a botched delivery that resulted in the stillbirth of a baby at ProMedica Bixby Hospital in 2008. According to the claim brought by the baby’s mother, the death was the result of the negligence of a nurse and a physician on staff at the hospital. The child was reportedly delivered well after it should have been due to the oversight of the providers.

Under Michigan law, non-economic damages are capped at $280,000 in most cases. It is possible for a higher cap of $500,000 to be applied in certain cases involving serious injuries, including severe brain injury. These amounts are adjusted yearly for inflation. Given the circumstances of this case, the lower limit is $440,300 and the cap is $774,000. 

Michigan family sues hospital over failed intubation

  • 09
  • July
    2014

A West Michigan family who lost one of its members in 2010 in during a botched emergency room visit is reportedly suing the hospital that administered the improper care for medical malpractice. The boy, according to sources, had been brought into the hospital after he asphyxiated in a bathtub and was revived by a family member.

By the time the boy arrived at the hospital, his oxygen levels were dropping. The issue in the case is that hospital staff caring for the boy were unsuccessful in providing him oxygen through a tube for over 20 minutes after his arrival. The day after the failed attempts at intubation, the boy was pronounced dead. 

Link Between Talcum Powder and Cancer Ignored For Years

  • 02
  • July
    2014

A growing number of Johnson's Baby Powder lawsuits and Shower-to-Shower lawsuits are now being pursued nationwide by women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, citing a history of studies and other reports that suggest concerns about the link between talcum powder and cancer have gone largely unaddressed for decades.

The use of talc as a body powder began in the late 1800s, and use of the products has grown in recent decades among women following a shower for feminine hygiene purposes.

Preventing infections a big goal for Detroit hospitals

  • 01
  • July
    2014

Infection is always somewhat of a risk in medical care. According to the Centers for Disease Control, about one in 20 patients get an infection from medical care. In addition, 100,000 die every year from such infections, though that number could potentially be a lot higher. Health care facilities worth their salt understand this risk and do everything they can to minimize the risk.

Fortunately, efforts at many hospitals in the Detroit area have proved successful in reducing the occurrence of healthcare-associated infections. To take one example, the Henry Ford Health System has reportedly reduced the occurrence of infections by almost 40 percent since increasing generally error prevention efforts in 2007. That is impressive, though more needs to be done. Other hospitals have taken a more targeted approach to preventing healthcare-associated infections.

Family wins $7.9M in connection with botched surgery

  • 17
  • June
    2014

William Beaumont Hospital in Grosse Pointe, along with a physician and an anesthesiologist, was recently ordered to pay $7.9 million to the family of a woman who died after receiving treatment for a stomach condition. The woman died back in 2009 after undergoing gall bladder surgery.

According to her family, the procedure was botched because the physician failed to place a breathing tube in her throat. The woman reportedly woke up during the surgery before going unconscious, after which she was transferred to another hospital where she went into cardiac arrest. She died during a second cardiac arrest.

Medication errors may improve with pharmacists' help

  • 12
  • June
    2014

Errors can occur in any area of medical practice. One quite common area for errors to occur is with the prescription and administration of medications. Not surprisingly, emergency room departments are places where medication errors are not uncommon. Because mistakes in this area can sometimes have serious ramifications, it is in the interest of hospitals to address the issue.

One way hospitals can do this, according to a recent report by NPR, is to have pharmacists available in emergency room departments. The report pointed out that the Children’s Medical Center in Dallas has had success in preventing medication errors by having pharmacists review all medication requests prior to dispensing and administering the medication. The challenge for hospitals is finding the funds to ensure such oversight. 

We get results for people like you

Our law firm has built a strong record of success in medical malpractice and personal injury lawsuits. We have obtained millions of dollars in compensation for people like you. In fact, for four out of the last seven years, our attorneys have obtained the biggest verdict in the state.

Follow Us Online
facebook logo linkedin logo twitter logo google plus logo