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Posts tagged "Medication Errors"

The dark underbelly of the world’s leading sleep aid

Since its release into the market over a decade ago, Ambien has become a ubiquitous name in the medical industry. It has been shown to induce sleep in about 20 minutes, and people all over the world have sworn by its efficacy. It has quickly become the number one prescription sleep aid as well as one of the top-selling prescription drugs in the United States—more widely consumed that Percocet or prescription-strength Ibuprofin. Its generic version—Zolpidem—sells for just $2 per pill, making it affordable to most consumers.

What constitutes a medication error?

Older readers will remember the commercial tagline "Without chemicals, life itself would be impossible." Monsanto put it out there back in the 1970s. These days, with all the attention on the environment and the effects of human activity upon it, many might be inclined to take a dim view of chemical production. However, that Monsanto line still carries some weight, especially when you consider how necessary chemicals are in the making of medications.

Study looks at low reporting rate of medication errors among anesthesiologists

Medication errors are a common type of medical error observed in the health care industry. In many cases, medication errors are preventable. These errors can be traced back to physicians, of course, in the prescription of medications, but also to pharmacists who prepare and dispense the medication, nurses who administer the medication, and the health care administration responsible for supervising medication-related matters.

Study suggests change in standard surgical practice may be appropriate

We have written before on this blog on the topic of medical standard of care. As we’ve noted, the medical standard of care can vary from one state to another and even from one community to another, depending on state law.

Identifying the standard of care in malpractice cases involving counseling professionals, P.2

In any healthcare-related liability case, it is not enough for a plaintiff to provide evidence of a poor outcome and to blame that poor outcome on the health professional. Not every poor health outcome is attributable to professional error, and not every professional error rises to the level of malpractice.

Identifying the standard of care in malpractice cases involving counseling professionals

Last time, we began looking at a malpractice case filed by a Michigan couple against a therapist who dropped the ball in caring for their daughter. Sources don’t specifically name the allegations, but do say the girl died from an overdose of an antidepressant medication.

Group highlights risk of medication errors with potent chemotherapy drug

Medication errors are one of the many types of mistakes that can occur in the delivery of health care. In many cases, medication errors have no significant consequence. In some cases, the consequences can be fatal. According to a study conducted earlier this year, ten percent of all deaths in the United States are due to medical errors, and medication errors are the third most common type of medical error.

Looking at what recent studies have to say about medication errors, P.2

Last time, we began speaking on the issue of medication errors, and mentioned a study which highlighted the high risk of medication errors occurring in connection with infants. Another recent study highlights the risk of medication errors from a different angle: that of health care data management mistakes.

Were you or a loved one the victim of a medication error?

Most Michigan readers are no doubt aware that scientists have created numerous medications to help us live longer and treat ailments for which there was previously no cure or relief. Most of these medications require that they be prescribed, filled and given with care. A medication error by a doctor, nurse or pharmacist could result in serious, permanent or fatal injuries to patients.

Standards for antibiotic use would help patients hold medical professionals accountable

Antibiotics are obviously very useful in the world of medicine, helping keep infections at bay and allowing patients to recover more quickly. In some cases, they are necessary to save a patient’s life. As with other good things, though, there comes a point where overuse of antibiotics can have potentially negative consequences. This, at least, is the concern among some medical professionals and medical researchers.