McKeen & Associates, PC
Call Today for a Free Consultation
866-585-1076 | 313-447-0634

November 2011 Archives

In Vitro Fertilization: Benefits for Posthumously Conceived Kids?

In vitro fertilization is a well-known medical procedure used to address infertility. The first so-called "test-tube baby" was born in 1978. Today, in vitro fertilization accounts for thousands of births every year (though these births are just a fraction of all births in the nation). The fertilization process takes place outside of the body, wherein egg cells are injected with sperm; the fertilized egg is then placed in the woman's uterus.

Erb's Palsy: Many Infants Fully Recover, Some Never Do

Erb's palsy is a birth injury to an infant's nerves around the shoulder, leading to below-average hand and arm strength in mild cases, to complete paralysis in the most severe cases. Erb's palsy is generally associated with difficult deliveries, often where the baby was stuck in the birth canal, and health care providers failed to provide a timely delivery by C-section.

NY Pilot Program Focuses on Early Settlement of Medical Malpractice Cases

"Even though people are not forced into it," says the director of the Center for Medical Consumers, "I have no idea how coercive or not the pitch is." By "pitch," director Arthur Levin is referring to early settlement talks in medical malpractice cases, which in New York have been shown to reduce overall payouts made to injured patients.

Bill on So-Called 'Tort Reform' Unlikely to Pass

As Brett Norman reports for Politico, the everlasting heated exchange between the Republicans and the Democrats is likely to cause any further efforts at so-called tort reform to stall out - one side blames trial lawyers for "out-of-control" medical malpractice lawsuits, while the other side blames the profit motive inherent in running an insurance company. A tort reform bill supported by the Republicans is unlikely to pass the Democrat-controlled Senate.

Medical Malpractice: No Dollar Value for Pain and Suffering?

Walter Olson, writing for the Cato Institute, argues that pain and suffering caused by medical malpractice is worth not one single penny. Were it not for what we have today in our civil justice system, Olson argues, pain and suffering wouldn't even enter into the equation, in large part because it's so difficult to measure the value of pain and suffering in any given case.